HOW TO BE A LIVING DONOR

How to Be a Living Donor

What is it?

The recipient will not need to be put on the national waiting list and face a long wait until an organ becomes available.Transplants from living donors are often more successful because of extensive pre-testing to ensure the best possible “match” based on medical criteria such as blood type.The transplant can be scheduled ahead of time and the surgery is performed when everyone is in optimal condition for the surgery. Living donation frees the recipient from dialysis: virtually all living donor kidneys begin to work immediately. Increased survival rates. National statistics indicate about a 10 percent increased success rate at one year for living donation.

Where will I be?

Varies

What will I do?

Opportunities in becoming a living donor. These are living people who can donate their kidney, partial lung, partial liver, and partial pancreas.

Contact:

For living kidney donation questions, contact Healthwise at Fairview University Medical Center (Minneapolis, MN) 800-824-1953.

For living liver donation questions, contact Wendy Cales at the Medical College of Virginia (Richmond, VA) 804-828-4060.

For bone marrow donation information visit the National Marrow Donor Program atwww.marrow.org or contact them at info@marrow.org or 1-800-654-1247.

Contributed by Danica Zold


NATIONAL MARROW DONATION PROGRAM

When you become a donor through the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP), you are participating in an effort to give patients with leukemia and other life-threatening blood diseases a second chance at life.

What is it?

Volunteers must be between the ages of 18 and 60, in good general health and willing.

Marrow donation is a surgical procedure. While you receive anesthesia, doctors use special, hollow needles to withdraw liquid marrow from the back of your pelvic bones. Many donors receive a transfusion of their own previously donated blood.

Where is it?

Varies

Contact/Website

http://www.marrow.org/

Contributed by Danica Zold


MUSCULOSKELETAL TRANSPLANT FOUNDATION

Everyday 17 people die waiting for a life-saving organ transplant. In addition, every year over 1,000,000 individual lives are helped through tissue and eye donation. You can help by making the decision to become an organ and tissue donor and sharing that decision with your family.

What is it?

You will need to be willing to donate your organs, tissues, and/or bones after death.Every potential donor must pass a thorough Quality Assurance process.

All tissues used by MTF are recovered from cadaveric donors in accordance with AATB standards using aseptic surgical techniques. Female age 12-70; male 12-70.

Where is it?

Varies

Contact

Go to www.shareyourlife.org or www.unos.org to find out your state’s protocol for registering to be an organ donor.

Website

http://www.mtf.org/

Contributed by Danica Zold


EYE BANK DONATION

The EBAA is a nonprofit organization with 109 member eye banks in over 150 locations that has saved more than one million individuals from going blind. As the oldest transplant association in the United States, the EBAA performs more than 42,000 sight-restoring transplants a year. While seeking the highest quality eye tissue, the EBAA also maintains extremely high safety standards for proficient eye tissue procurement, preservation, storage and transplantation. Members of the EBAA include well-qualified ophthalmologists, corneal surgeons, and researchers.

What is it?

Fill out a donor card specifying eye tissue donation. Or work as an eye surgeon, administrator, or eye bank certified technician.

Where is it?

Contact/Website

For more information about EBAA:
See http://www.restoresight.org/ or email info@restoresight.org
To locate an EBAA eye bank near you:
See http://www.restoresight.org/eye_banks/eye_banks.htm
Link to a printable donor card:
http://www.restoresight.org/donor.htm

Contributed by Danica Zold


EGG DONATION

What is it?
Every year, more than 6.1 million women struggle with infertility. Today, nearly 1 out of 6 couples are diagnosed with infertility after trying unsuccessfully for a year to become pregnant.  Whether it is due to premature ovarian failure, diminished ovarian reserves, or genetically transmittable diseases, millions of women cannot fulfill their dreams of having a baby. Egg donation is one of the few precious ways to help these aspiring parents. Donating an egg is a relatively painless procedure that, if chosen, can be kept anonymous. There are several steps involved in the application process, and they include: qualification reviews, photographs, consent forms, selection and screening processes and fertility drugs and monitoring. Actual egg retrieval begins once doctors have determined that the donor’s eggs have matured. An injection of HCG (Human chorionic gonadotropin) is administered to trigger ovulation. After
36 hours, the donor is given a mild sedation, and the egg is retrieved through transvaginal ultrasound. The procedure lasts approximately 30 minutes. Donors are usually compensated an honorarium ranging from $5,000 – $10, 000 for their time and effort.

Volunteer Requirements
Generally, a donor needs to be between the ages of 21 and 30. It is also very important that the donor leads a healthy lifestyle and does not smoke or have a history with drugs. It is often preferable that the donor has or is pursuing a college degree.

Where will I be?
There are hundreds of local clinics spread across the country, any of which can be found at http://www.ihr.com/infertility/provider/donoregg.html.

To register with NEEDS (National Exchange for Egg Donation and Surrogacy):
http://www.fertilityneeds.com/Registration/QualChecklist.asp?UserType=EggDonor

For more information about the application process and actual procedure:
http://www.fertilityneeds.com/ForDonors/BecomingDonor.asp

For more information about infertility:
http://www.americanpregnancy.org/infertility/whatisinfertility.html
Contributed by Sadia Dimbil